A glimpse of Nagasaki’s Temples.

KOTAIJI TEMPLE

Kameyama Shachu’s Kondo Chojiro is buried, along with Kosene Eishiro, a member of the Kaientai, in the Kosone family grave at this temple. As an employee of the Kameyama Shachu company founded by Sakamoto Ryoma, Kondo played a role in the procurement of ships and weapons for the Choshu clan in 1865. However, following an accusation that he broke company rules, he committed seppuku in the Kosone residence on January 14, 1866. The epitaph “Baika Shooku” is said to have been written by Ryoma. Kosone Eishiro (1841-1890) was the younger brother of the Nagasaki merchant Kosone Kendo, and tirelessly supported Ryoma’s activities. He also served as the finance officer for the Kaientai.

Kotaiji Temple
Kotaiji Temple
Surrounding gardens.
Surrounding gardens.

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View of shrine and gardens.
View of temple and gardens.
Entrance to shrine.
Entrance to temple.

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Post/lamp in the front of shrine.
Post/lamp in the front of temple.

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View inside the shrine.
View inside the temple.
Close up.
Close up.
Objects inside the shrine to the left.
Objects inside the temple to the left.
Objects inside the shrine to the right.
Objects inside the temple to the right.
More buildings on the grounds of the shrine.
More buildings on the grounds of the temple.
Gravesites.
Many gravesites surround the temple.

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SENFUKUJI TEMPLE

Sofukuji is not a Japanese temple, but a Chinese temple. Not only that, it is also said to be one of the best examples of Ming Dynasty temple architecture remaining anywhere, even within China. Sofukuji was established around 1629. The Inner Gate, Daiippomon, and the main Buddha Hall, Daiohoden, were made in Ningbo, China, disassembled, shipped to Nagasaki and reassembled. They are both national treasures. The Buddha hall is claimed to be the oldest building in Nagasaki. The other buildings, including the first gate you enter through, were constructed later in the 19th century.

Entrance to Sofukuji Temple.
Entrance to Sofukuji Temple.

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Cool doorknobs.
Cool doorknobs.
Guardians of the temple.
Guardians of the temple.
Entrance to the temple.
Entrance to the temple.
Intricate work of the roof.
Intricate work of the roof.
Up close.
Up close.
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Inside the temple grounds.
Panoramic view of inside of the temple grounds.
Panoramic view of inside of the temple grounds.

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Great Cauldron. This cauldron was used by the temple monks to feed up to 3,000 people a day during a famine in the late 17th century.
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Sofukuji Temple Bell. This large bell, which is strung with a hanging log in the bell tower, was forged in 1647 by Ayama Kunihisa, the first generation of the famous family of blacksmiths. He is said to have produced six bells, but only this one remains today.
View from up on the mountain overlooking the temple rooftops.
View from up on the mountain overlooking the temple rooftops.
Us at Sofukuji Temple.
Us at Sofukuji Temple.

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Lindsay View All →

Our roots will forever be from here, America, born and raised. Yet, life requires us to move more frequently than we care to count. Whether living stateside or abroad, you can always find us traveling somewhere. We scout out places that you only think you can dream of one day seeing and we seek out those that aren’t found in guidebooks. We then bring them to life here in our travel memos, so hopefully, one day you too can visit them or at least be able to live vicariously through us. This blog isn’t just about crossing off places from a bucket list. It’s about absorbing and learning how other cultures grow and fit into the same world that we do. Life is short and the world is big. Enjoy and get out there!

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